Psychology of Design (PoD) Laboratory

Liza Josias Explaining the Role Human Factors Plays in Work Performance


Graduate Student Path:


Our graduate program follows the scientist-practitioner model. The primary goal is for you to develop the intellectual and technical skills necessary to become a leading scientist. Our lab and collaborative approach helps you develop into a Human Factors of Computing Systems researcher. It is an exciting time to be researching the interaction between humans and systems. We are developing new theories that amplify human work performance from cyberspace to the international space station. In this lab, you are expected to perform at a high level and make professional contributions (see publications)! But, you will find the climate open, nurturing, and cooperative. [ Join the Team ]

Undergraduate Student Path:

Our lab affords students the opportunity to perform and direct research activities under the guidance of both junior and senior scientists. As a new research assistant much of your time will be spent collecting human participant data. Along the way you will develop the necessary skills to mature as a scientist and start directing research activities. You will initially start by completing ethics and research conduct training and by learning how to use the SONA system (the participant pool management software), help maintain accurate and confidential records, and how to use our experimental equipment (e.g., eye tracking system). As an experienced research assistant, you will be encouraged to generate your own thesis, complete library searches, prepare experimental materials, summarize deliverables, and collect and analyze data with the goal of presenting at a research conference. [ Join the Team ]

Recent Undergraduate Outcomes:

Cain, A. A., Dindial, H. L., Duplaintis, P. E., Edwards, M. E., & Still, J. D. (2017, April). Over the shoulder attack resistance of Use Your Illusion authentication. Poster presented at the Southeastern Human Factors Applied Research Conference, Raleigh, NC.

Cain, A. A., Griner, J., Tiller, L., Unverricht, J. R., & Still, J. D. (2017, April). Comparing measurement approaches of over-the-shoulder-attack resistance for graphical authentication. Poster presented at the Southeastern Human Factors Applied Research Conference, Raleigh, NC.

Cain, A. A., Chiu, L., Santiago, F., & Still, J. D. (2016). Swipe authentication: Exploring over-the-shoulder attack performance. In D. Nicholson (Ed.), Advances in Human Factors Cybersecurity (pp. 327-336). Walt Disney World, Florida, USA: Springer.

Chiu, L., Weigel, C., Dovedot, T. Vo, C., & Still, J. D. (2015, May). Swipe Authentication: Exploring error feedback's impact on over-the-shoulder attack performance. Poster presented at the 58th Annual Spartan Psychological Association Research Conference, San Jose, CA.

Shokrpour, A., Palma, A., Gomez, M., Santiago, F., & Still, J. D. (2014, May). Swipe authentication: Exploring over-the-shoulder-attack performance. Poster presented at the 57th Annual Spartan Psychological Association Research Conference, San Jose, CA.


Our Human Factors doctoral program is fully accredited by the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Plus, we have an active and award winning student chapter!

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